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The OCAI Blog about Culture

Here’s where I blog about organizational culture, culture change, and the Competing Values Framework and the OCAI culture survey. Frequency of posting: about every 2 weeks.

The Leadership & Change Blog

Here’s where I write about Positive Leadership, Organizational Culture, Organizational Change, New Organizations, Personal Development and reflection. In addition, the blog category Positive Power is a book that I blog in real-time! The purpose is to upgrade to positive organizations where both people and performance thrive. 
Frequency of posting: every week
  • Future Reflection: The Power of Culture
    Future Reflection: The Power of Culture Marcella Bremer Tue, 28/07/2020 - 09:20 Here’s the second part of a reflection on historian Yuval Noah Harari’s work for individuals, professionals, leaders, consultants, teams, and organizations. This series is based on Harari’s books “21 lessons for the 21st century” and “Homo Deus, a brief history of the future”. What’s happening in the global system around organizations? What influences might there be for you and your team? The power of Culture Most studies cite intelligence and tool-production as the reason why homo sapiens flourished. That certainly helped, but what really made a difference is that humans can cooperate very flexibly with large numbers of strangers, beyond their well-known and trusted family and friends. Organizations, movements, kingdoms, and states came into existence when sapiens developed language and started to construct new realities in the last 70,000 years. With language comes culture. Thanks to language, we live in three layers of reality: objective, subjective, intersubjective. We have the objective reality of measurable facts, we have our subjective feelings, and we have the intersubjective realm of culture. Culture is the story that we live in. The values we believe, the norms we adhere to, the stories that motivate and inspire us, the agreements about what is true, real, good, or bad. Language, stories, and culture are the basics of organizing and organizations. Culture keeps large systems intact and enables collaboration with many strangers who believe in the same story. It’s this large human collaboration that built the great wall of China and sent people to the moon. This is not the achievement of individuals. Individuals can’t have close relationships with more than 150 people. In smaller bands, we use warm logic; we accept offers that are fair, not those that are very unequal. Yet, ...
    Source: OCAI onlinePublished on 2020-07-28
  • Future Reflection: What Humans Want
    Future Reflection: What Humans Want Marcella Bremer Tue, 14/07/2020 - 15:11 While working with culture, change, leaders, and organizations I notice our VUCA-world: Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, and Ambiguous. The recent Corona pandemic has emphasized this even more.
 Organizations are part of a global VUCA-system. If we want to improve anything, we need to see change at four levels: the global system, the organization or association of organizations, the group or team, and the individual level. Everything that happens in the world at large, matters to you and your organization. Let’s look at how future developments might affect professionals and organizations. 
 Here’s the first part of a reflection on historian Yuval Noah Harari’s work for individuals, professionals, leaders, consultants, teams, and organizations. This series is based on Harari’s books “21 lessons for the 21st century” and “Homo Deus, a brief history of the future”. What’s happening in the global system around organizations? What influences might there be for you and your team?
 The new human agenda The four horsemen of the Apocalypse have pestered humanity for ages: famine, plague, war, and death. Until the last few decades. For the first time in history, fewer people die of infectious diseases than old age (even though we witness a pandemic right now). In 2050, we hope to have nanorobots or better vaccines to kill any germs and viruses, but the battle goes on… Today, fewer people die of hunger than of obesity, and fewer people die by violence than by accidents. Wars are disappearing: the law of the jungle was broken in the second part of the 20th century. It’s no use to go to war: it’s no longer profitable. Today, the main source of wealth is knowledge. There’s no need to conquer land, physical resources, machines. Cyberwarfare is ...
    Source: OCAI onlinePublished on 2020-07-14
  • Positive Leaders: Pick your problems and values
    Positive Leaders: Pick your problems and values Marcella Bremer Tue, 23/06/2020 - 09:10 The concept of positive organizations, culture, and leaders is often misunderstood. It’s equated to happy-bunny fake smiles or being too soft on the slackers in your team or denial of life’s hard parts. Positive refers to a positive outlook on the problems in life and work, to being authentic (including bad days) and sustaining positive relationships based on trust. If you want to know what a positive culture entails, check this earlier post. The counterintuitive wisdom in Mark Manson’s book The subtle art of not giving a F**k, shows the positive impact of negative things - and the negativity of fake, dogmatic positivity. Even though you probably know this, it might be an inspiring and connecting exercise to reflect on the problems, values, and metrics that make your team positive performers. Happiness is a hamster wheel Manson’s tone may be a little too popular, but he’s right when he says that we suffer from material success and abundance of choices in the modern world. There’s a lot of stress, anxiety or depression. Our problem is spiritual and existential: we have so many opportunities and stuff that it’s hard to know what matters most to us. We get distracted and overwhelmed. At the same time, we feel bad about feeling bad while we have everything that our grandparents dreamed of. We also feel an obligation to be healthy, happy and successful because people share  happy pictures on social media - we must keep up with the Jones’s, as happiness is the norm. It’s not easy to admit that we’re not perfect (not even to ourselves). But when we suppress or avoid what’s negative - we exacerbate the feeling. Positive leaders accept what’s bad - and ...
    Source: OCAI onlinePublished on 2020-06-23
  • Positive Culture and Ego needs
    Positive Culture and Ego needs Marcella Bremer Mon, 08/06/2020 - 10:35 Do you aim for an open, inclusive, diverse, and positive culture in a flat organization, where all employees take ownership and feel responsible, proud, and motivated?  A workplace that benefits from different perspectives and positive criticism? That’s agile and ready for innovation and change? A culture that embraces learning, and can handle uncertainty? The four ingredients of a positive culture are Positive Awareness (to amplify what is working well and see possibilities), Connection & Collaboration, Shared Purpose & Meaning, and Learning & Autonomy. Positive cultures stimulate a “creator attitude.” We create our organization together, and every person contributes and is responsible for the whole. We cherish an “inner locus of control”: focusing on what we can do without permission or resources from others. Positive cultures have a lot of energy, openness to ideas and others, relationships based on trust and authenticity, participation, support for others, and an eye for positive potential. They cherish learning and development, collaboration, a meaningful shared purpose, and professional autonomy. If we are honest, this is easier said than done. Reality looks different than the ideal - and we often blame leaders. It’s their narrow-mindedness and old-fashioned ways, their egos, that hold organizations back in the industrial age while employees disengage, and results deteriorate. Sometimes leaders are the culprit, but it’s not just the leaders that keep organizations stuck. Both human nature and nurture keep organizations grounded in the past. Positive leadership to Self and others asks for personal development - both for leaders and employees. Ego needs If you are human (whether you are a leader or an employee) and you’re honest, there are moments that you think and feel: I want a leader  You’d like someone to solve the issues, ...
    Source: OCAI onlinePublished on 2020-06-08
  • Culture and Leadership during and after Corona – part 2
    Culture and Leadership during and after Corona - part 2 Marcella Bremer Tue, 26/05/2020 - 11:12 What is going on in this Corona pandemic? In my last post, we looked at some aspects of self-leadership, organizational culture, and organizational Leadership in corona time. Let's look at employee engagement and the ability to change rapidly. Suddenly, organizations become agile! How is your organization or team doing? What to change and how to keep the momentum? Hopeful is the Gallup research that shows "that companies are treating their employees better than ever. And employee engagement, a problem that plagues more than two-thirds of companies year after year, is actually going up". This is what Gallup's Josh Bersin writes. "Once people started working at home, companies immediately discovered issues in social isolation, stress, and time management. Well the response has been amazing. Companies are teaching yoga and have group exercise programs online, at one company the chef is teaching cooking classes, and another has launched a "happiness challenge" for people working at home." Agility and Change in corona time Now is the time of rapid changes. What didn't seem possible before, suddenly is happening. From keeping planes on the ground (can you believe it?) to shifting production from beds to mouth caps (as bed factory Auping did) to working from home and video conferencing. Everyone is learning! As one client organization told me: "We used to get skills training before using new software. Now we're just thrown in the deep with collaborating online and video conferencing. Guess what? We pulled it off! I wouldn't have believed this before the pandemic - if you told me that our organization would just experiment and do it, without training and a manual!" Welcome to creativity, experimentation, trial-and-error, and being brave! Our quick crisis responses ...
    Source: OCAI onlinePublished on 2020-05-26
  • Culture and Leadership during and after Corona – part 1
    Culture and Leadership during and after Corona - part 1 Marcella Bremer Tue, 12/05/2020 - 10:57 We're working and living in this Corona pandemic. Everything changed almost overnight. We need to adjust to a different reality and come to terms with new visions of the future, shifting priorities, feeling anxiety or fear or worry, working from home, video-conferencing with colleagues and clients, washing hands all the time, checking our financial and physical status: are we still safe?  Organizations in many sectors will have to survive a brutal short term to access long-term options. But while survival may be top of mind today, thriving is the long game. Where are you on the line of suffer-survive-thrive? What have you learned to date? It's just so much! It's the practicalities of moving to remote work overnight and being quarantined (with kids, pets, noise around) and video-calling parents and friends and missing so much that we took for granted. Portal to a new world It's the uncertainty of the world that showed its current VUCA nature: Volatile, Uncertain, Complex, and Ambiguous. What will emerge? A better tomorrow: a world transitioned to more sustainability, kindness, and connection? Or a harsh tomorrow: a collapsing global economy and suffering societies? Or a world that ignores and denies what just happened - clinging to old beliefs and ways of production and consumption. How to go through the transition? The pandemic is a portal to a new tomorrow, whatever that will look like. For both individuals and organizations, it's an opportunity to transform. As the novelist, Arundhati Roy says: "Historically, pandemics have forced humans to break with the past and imagine their world anew. This one is no different. It is a portal, a gateway between one world and the next. We can ...
    Source: OCAI onlinePublished on 2020-05-12
  • Culture: Tribal roles at work
    Culture: Tribal roles at work Marcella Bremer Tue, 28/04/2020 - 00:46 Who are you? You might be an individualistic, highly-educated, autonomous professional - just like many other leaders, professionals, coaches, and consultants reading this blog. You might think that you’re alone, unique, and independent. But we’re always connected to the larger whole. You’re part of a few tribes, clans, or groups - be they family, groups of friends, communities, or the organization. Your deep psychological needs urge you to belong to a group and collaborate on a shared purpose that gives meaning to life and work. Healthy tribes, groups, and organizations fulfill our need to belong, and our need for meaning, clarity, and safety. And whether you like it or not, thinking of yourself as a modern, independent individual, you might play a tribal role in your organizational system.  Looking at the roles in traditional tribes can help you gain insights into the interaction dynamics in modern organizations. What’s possible in different positions? It might help to understand yourself and others, and where you would be at your best at work. Looking at the organization as a tribe with a distinct culture, you might see with whom you could collaborate to leverage organizational change - and how to make it work for different groups. These roles are inspired by the Dutch book Building Tribes by anthropologists Jitske Kramer and Danielle Braun. The Chief Thinking of your organization as a tribe, who stands out? The chief, of course. The chief in modern times is the leader, the executive, the CEO, or the project leader. Their task is to represent the organization, to guarantee safety (against threats from the outside), to make decisions, set the direction to go toward, set boundaries, coordinate the others and lead them toward the ...
    Source: OCAI onlinePublished on 2020-04-28
  • Corona: Practice Positivity and Virtual collaboration
    Corona: Practice Positivity and Virtual collaboration Marcella Bremer Tue, 14/04/2020 - 10:00 The Corona or Covid-19 pandemic is unprecedented and still feels a bit surreal. It's causing disruptive change in the way we live, work, act, interact and think. In my last post, we reflected on personal development and opening up, on what is emerging, what we can let go of, what our team's purpose is, and how we contribute to the whole. This is an opportunity to develop a caring culture of compassion at work and in life. Let's also look at some practical tips to cope with the new reality of working at home, virtual meetings, and staying positive. Virtual meeting: Check-In and Out Rachel Ben Hamou shares some great tips, such as the Check-in and Check-out of your virtual meeting. This might be even more important in a virtual meeting than onsite, as it allows people to "arrive" and share quickly. Check-in: Ask each person to share whether they are feeling red, orange or green in the current moment. It’s a great way to prepare everyone for the conversation. Red means you’re overwhelmed, stressed, upset or generally having a tough time. Orange means things aren’t ideal but you’re coping. Green means you’re feeling good about things. It’s important to recognize that all feelings are valid and this isn’t a session to fix or address anyone’s color. If someone says red, you might follow up with them afterwards. Let them know you’ve got their back and are there for support. Check-out: Check-outs are a quick way of polling people for reflections on the session. It helps bring a sense of closure to the gathering and helps people mentally and emotionally transition out of the conversation. Connect with Purpose and Contribution The Center of Positive Organizations ...
    Source: OCAI onlinePublished on 2020-04-14
  • Corona: Practice Positivity and Virtual collaboration
    The Corona or Covid-19 pandemic is unprecedented and still feels a bit surreal. It’s causing disruptive change in the way we live, work, act, interact and think. In my last post, we reflected on personal development and opening up, on what is emerging, what we can let go of, what our team’s purpose is, and how we contribute to the ... Read More ...
    Source: L&C MagazinePublished on 2020-04-14
  • Corona: Disruptive Change reflection
    The pandemic of Corona or Covid-19 is unprecedented and still feels a bit surreal. Is this really happening? Uhm, yes! It’s fascinating to see what happens, how you and I respond, how priorities shift all of a sudden, and how crucial values surface. We see how governments and corporations halt the economy (by sending people home) to protect everyone’s health ... Read More ...
    Source: L&C MagazinePublished on 2020-03-31
  • Corona: Disruptive Change reflection
    Corona: Disruptive Change reflection Marcella Bremer Tue, 31/03/2020 - 10:43 The pandemic of Corona or Covid-19 is unprecedented and still feels a bit surreal. Is this really happening? Uhm, yes! It's fascinating to see what happens, how you and I respond, how priorities shift all of a sudden, and how crucial values surface. We see how governments and corporations halt the economy (by sending people home) to protect everyone's health and avoid further societal disruption.  As a side-effect, we see how Covid-19 has accomplished more to reduce CO2 emissions within weeks than all climate conversations combined have done in years. We see how it brings out the best and the worst in people - from offering free meals and help to hoarding toilet paper and attending parties because some feel immortal (and don't care about the macro view of keeping the population as safe as possible). We see how office workers have to work from home - and how virtual meetings become the standard while many gatherings are canceled. We see our own response to the sudden outbreak. From disbelief, to anxiety, to getting used to it, to acceptance, to positive action: What can I do to make the best of it? What can I contribute to my team, my community, my family? This is a wake-up call and a systemic primer for change. Corona affects our modern culture, and the cultures in our teams and organizations. I'd like to share some philosophical reflections by others that resonated with me - may they help you, too, when you're struggling as a leader, consultant, or employee. Wake Up My wise colleague Graham Williams writes: One spiritual growth framework, often attributed to Ken Wilber, is that of Wake up. Grow up. Clean up. Show up.  My own take ...
    Source: OCAI onlinePublished on 2020-03-31
  • Culture: Working with idiots?
    Culture: Working with idiots? Marcella Bremer Tue, 17/03/2020 - 16:31 We all have days that it seems we have to work with idiots. Of course, that’s not true! Sometimes we have more difficulty coping with different styles. That’s okay. As long as we don’t blame the others - but catch ourselves before we do and adjust communication. Thomas Erickson explains the styles and how to work with your colleagues in his book, Surrounded by idiots. The four types were developed by psychologist W.M. Marston and our well-known as DISC. The DISC color-coding system maps the four behavioral styles for a certain context. It’s not to say that you always behave according to this style! Most people have two dominant styles. The simple DISC styles help to understand yourself and others. You can accommodate your style to better collaborate with others. What’s your style at work? And does that match the culture? So, what will we do!! In one of my culture workshops, the participants were interrupted a lot by one person who asked: “So, what will we DO with this culture profile?” “How’s our culture going to change?” “Stop explaining and give me some actions and outcomes!” It was clear that he was very committed and engaged - even though he disrupted the dialogue and collective reflection that the group needed to come to conclusions. He tried to speed up the process - and caused irritation. The group wanted results as well - but they also wanted to make sure that all voices were heard and all (dis)advantages of actions taken into account. The impatient person had a Dominant style - he was an extreme “Red” oriented person who craved concrete actions and outcomes, preferably yesterday. He saw himself as determined, efficient, and very smart. He thought ...
    Source: OCAI onlinePublished on 2020-03-17
  • Culture: Working with idiots?
    We all have days that it seems we have to work with idiots. Of course, that’s not true! Sometimes we have more difficulty coping with different styles. That’s okay. As long as we don’t blame the others – but catch ourselves before we do and adjust communication. Thomas Erickson explains the styles and how to work with your colleagues in ... Read More ...
    Source: L&C MagazinePublished on 2020-03-17
  • Lonely? Cultures of working too hard
    How busy are you? How supported do you feel? How much time can you make to have conversations that matter – with friends, family, co-workers? Honestly, how lonely do you feel? It’s a pattern in modern economies. Life can be demanding, at work and at home. The pace is high. Everyone and everything seems real-time available via screens; loads of ... Read More ...
    Source: L&C MagazinePublished on 2020-03-03
  • Lonely? Cultures of working too hard
    Lonely? Cultures of working too hard Marcella Bremer Tue, 03/03/2020 - 09:47 How busy are you? How supported do you feel? How much time can you make to have conversations that matter - with friends, family, co-workers? Honestly, how lonely do you feel? It's a pattern in modern economies. Life can be demanding, at work and at home. The pace is high. Everyone and everything seems real-time available via screens; loads of information, tasks, emails, contacts and opportunities compete for your attention. But our time and energy aren't limitless. I see it around me - people are tired, stressed, irritated. I see it inside me - I've been on a rollercoaster of projects myself. I loved the adrenaline and the action. But I didn't have time left for reflection and deep conversations. Working too hard I notice this in client organizations as well. One client knew that they had to do something about the culture as their metrics showed too many sick days, employee turnover, and attrition. I worked with several groups of managers to look at their culture and what they could improve. These guys worked so hard; they could hardly slow down. It had become normal to give it your all - and then some more. People were working overtime by default, and it was never enough. High targets were like holy cows, and they started to lose their "spark": the motivation, the purpose, the joy of getting things done together. There wasn't time to connect with co-workers, to tap each other's brains, to support one another. They were addicted to action while reflecting and connecting might have offered them ways to work smarter instead of harder. Though these managers liked to work hard and get results, they agreed this results orientation had gone overboard. ...
    Source: OCAI onlinePublished on 2020-03-03
  • Culture: Diversity and Inclusion
    Culture: Diversity and Inclusion Marcella Bremer Tue, 25/02/2020 - 12:02 When we're working with organizational culture we aim to develop a culture that helps the organization achieve its goals and be successful in the long run.  Safety Psychological safety is an essential ingredient of a positive and productive culture. This safety helps people to speak their mind, contribute energy and ideas, be transparent and open, and take action as they feel ownership or responsibility. Let's summarize this as engagement. It's the opposite of what you see in unsafe cultures where hiding and hoarding is the norm, pointing to others or external causes, not speaking your mind but staying safe in the shadows: disengagement prevails. It's not hard to see why successful organizations are safe: hiding and hoarding slows everyone and everything down, and bad ideas could be implemented because no one speaks up. On the other side, is what Steven Covey called "the speed of trust". When it's safe, it's easy to share objections or disadvantages and improve plans before they are implemented. It's easy to share ideas and energy and take action and be a "market-forward" organization. Diversity Another ingredient of a positive, successful culture is called "diversity and inclusion". That's not just the latest fad. More than 75% of Fortune 1000 companies started diversity initiatives as it's proven to lead to better results and perceived as being market-forward - and the right thing to do. Workplace diversity is understanding, accepting, and valuing differences between people. Think of different races, ethnicities, genders, ages, religions, disabilities, and sexual orientations, but also in education, personalities, skill sets, experiences, and knowledge bases. Inclusion is a collaborative, supportive, and respectful environment that increases the participation and contribution of all employees. That's what I call a positive, productive culture.  The next ...
    Source: OCAI onlinePublished on 2020-02-25
  • Culture: Diversity and Inclusion
    When we’re working with organizational culture we aim to develop a culture that helps the organization achieve its goals and be successful in the long run. Safety Psychological safety is an essential ingredient of a positive and productive culture. This safety helps people to speak their mind, contribute energy and ideas, be transparent and open, and take action as they ... Read More ...
    Source: L&C MagazinePublished on 2020-02-18
  • Culture: Relations with co-workers
    As I attended a comedy show from a relational therapist, what struck me was how much this applied to culture, leadership and collaboration at work… You bond with co-workers and you want to achieve goals together, just like at home. You’re in a relationship with co-workers. Others that are different than you. How do people cope with differences? Relational therapist ... Read More ...
    Source: L&C MagazinePublished on 2020-02-04
  • Culture: Relations with co-workers
    Culture: Relations with co-workers Marcella Bremer Tue, 04/02/2020 - 12:01 As I attended a comedy show from a relational therapist, what struck me was how much this applied to culture, leadership and collaboration at work… You bond with co-workers and you want to achieve goals together, just like at home. You’re in a relationship with co-workers. Others that are different than you. How do people cope with differences? Relational therapist Jeroen Stek sees couples who deny all differences and bond into a prominent WE. “We do everything together, we like the same things, we’re fine!” Another way to deal with differences is a division in who does and decides what. Every “I” has their own expertise and is a boss in one area or another: it’s dominance and submission. “He arranges the vacations, she decides on refurbishing the house.” Or one of the two is the boss in everything, and the other one surrenders. We versus I It’s the same at work. You’re a close team that ignores or diminishes differences. “We’re the best of colleagues! We like each other! Always.” Or you see leaders and followers: dominant and more submissive colleagues. Eevery relationship balances the polarities of together or alone, group versus individual, adjustment or autonomy. Both the WE-go-always-well-together and the "hierarchy-of-different-I’s" are coping strategies that aren’t sustainable in the long run. There’s a moment when you can’t or won’t adjust yourself. Or when you’re fed up with organizing everything for this passive co-worker. Or working as your hyperactive, bossy colleague demands. Then there’s explosion (a dysfunctional fight) or implosion (you withdraw). You quit, you stop doing your best or sharing your input, you resort to indifference if you can. What do you see at work, with yourself and others? Above Under Opposed Together These coping ...
    Source: OCAI onlinePublished on 2020-02-04
  • Ethical Culture at work
    Ethical is the most important face of the future. Ethics is at the heart of being human; to have purpose, ideals, direction, vision, and spirituality. Ethics is also about corporate behavior, expected conduct, compliance, regulations, and the boundaries of what is acceptable. Here’s part 2, based on futurist Patrick Dixon’s “six faces of the future,” as discussed in his book ... Read More ...
    Source: L&C MagazinePublished on 2020-01-20
  • Ethical Culture at work
    Ethical Culture at work Marcella Bremer Mon, 20/01/2020 - 11:48 Ethical is the most important face of the future. Ethics is at the heart of being human; to have purpose, ideals, direction, vision, and spirituality. Ethics is also about corporate behavior, expected conduct, compliance, regulations, and the boundaries of what is acceptable. Here's part 2, based on futurist Patrick Dixon's "six faces of the future," as discussed in his book "The future of almost everything." What lessons can you learn? What triggers or inspires you? "Recent banking and political scandals have been a sharp reminder of why ethics matter. Corruption costs at least 5% (2,6 trillion USD) of global GDP - fat bribes for government contracts, tax revenues diverted into secret bank accounts, dishonest judges or policemen, and so on. Without shared ethics, our future will descend into a lawless hell with unrestrained greed, extremes of wealth, and widespread social unrest." Human nature is still the same as 2000 years ago. People look for meaning in their lives and want to feel they make a difference. The search for purpose has become more intense, though, as people have more time and money to think. The first Ethical test Dixon concluded early in his career that life is too short to do things you don't believe in. That's the first ethical test for yourself. "Why sell things you would never recommend to a friend or family member? Why bother to sell things that aren't right for the customer? Why work for a company that you're ashamed of?" How do you pass this test? The second Ethical test The second test is the feeling of ease or unease. You may be asked to do something while there's no law against it. Nor is there any absolute reason why you ...
    Source: OCAI onlinePublished on 2020-01-20
  • Organizational Culture remains Tribal
    New beginnings! What will the future bring? Futurist Patrick Dixon summarizes the “six faces of the future” in his book “The future of almost everything” as: Fast – the speed of change, AI, robotics, volatile, everything connected to everything Urban – urbanization, demography, fashions, fads Tribal – nations, culture, social networks, brands, teams, all different Universal – globalization, retail, e-commerce, ... Read More ...
    Source: L&C MagazinePublished on 2020-01-06
  • The best on culture and leadership – 2019
    It’s time to wind down, take care of yourself, and rekindle the relationships with friends and family. If you like to spend some December downtime on reflection, reading, and recharging, read the seven best leadership articles of this past year. What will you do next year? Which one inspires you to action? #1 How Culture boosts Performance Organizational culture is ... Read More ...
    Source: L&C MagazinePublished on 2019-12-24
  • The best on culture and leadership
    The best on culture and leadership Marcella Bremer Tue, 24/12/2019 - 10:00 It's time to wind down, take care of yourself, and rekindle the relationships with friends and family. If you like to spend some December downtime on reflection, reading, and recharging, read the seven best leadership articles of this past year. What will you do next year? Which article inspires you to action?  #1 How Culture boosts Performance Organizational #culture is your cutting edge, and a positive culture boosts performance! Are you willing to make 2019 your most positive and productive year to date? Check what you can start doing today. #2 The Cost of a Toxic Culture Organizational #culture can cost you! Is your organization just tough, or also toxic? The annual damage to productivity is shocking, as research shows. Developing the culture can quickly grow productivity, on the other hand. Can you afford to not invest in culture? #3 Leaders as Hero, Servant, Host What would happen if you saw your next project as a party with you as the host? It would feel more like fun, and the results of this "party" could amaze you. The positive leader is a host. #4 Gratitude, Contribution, and Abundance Gratitude, contribution to others, and positive relationships create an Abundance Culture. If you think that's touchy-feely research, read this real-life positive case about Prudential Financial.  #5 Leadership: Progress, not Perfection Do you put the bar too high? Do you tend to be a perfectionist instead of a positive (self) leader? Help yourself and others focus on the progress you make. #6 How Power impacts your team The Lens of Power distorts how others see us and how we see others with a different social rank. Power abuse happens when you over-use or under-use it. A positive leader ...
    Source: OCAI onlinePublished on 2019-12-24
  • Positive Teams and People: Purpose
    Positive Teams and People: Purpose Marcella Bremer Tue, 10/12/2019 - 16:50 If you've been a long-time reader of my blog, you might know that my work on positive organizations is also inspired by Charles Eisenstein. He's a thought leader on the big questions of our time, talking about economics, climate crisis, and humanity. He's looking for an antidote for the scientific narrative that we are separate from the world. It makes people feel like lonely, random accidents of the evolution that compete with each other and the earth. I wrote about Charles' vision for a "more beautiful world" here. By the way, don't dismiss Eisenstein as another utopian hippie. He's a Yale graduate in Philosophy and Mathematics and grounded in science. He's not against science. "The science story freed people once from dogmatic religion. But, the science story does no longer support life! It leads to exhausting ecosystems and competing with each other." Here's a philosophical reflection inspired by Eisenstein's new video course Metaphysics & Mystery. It blends very well with the principles of positive leadership and positive culture. What's your Purpose? Eisenstein dives right into the big question: Why am I here? Different cultures provided different answers. The answer that science provided was a non-answer: our existence is the result of a chapter of accidents, and meaning and purpose are but human projections onto a random world. Not a very inspirational vision or purpose! Charles Eisenstein's answer is "To serve life" or "To contribute to the universe becoming more alive." He says: "Don't take my word for it! The invitation here is to examine yourself for evidence of that. What choices give you the feeling, "This is why I am here"? What actions make YOU feel more alive, more fully yourself, when you take them?" What ...
    Source: OCAI onlinePublished on 2019-12-10
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